Seven brand identity by B&W Studio

Seven logo design

Design consultancy B&W Studio, based in Leeds, created this identity for Seven back in 2007. I like it. Thought you would, too.

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

Seven logo design

As with many identities, the logo in isolation isn’t what makes it work, and what I like most is the consistency of implementation across print and web, giving a strong and professional unity.

View more work on the brand spanking B&W Studio website.

Or visit the Seven website to see the identity in context.

Photography by Matt Wright.
Via Grafikcache.

Logo Design Love, the book

27 thoughts on “Seven brand identity by B&W Studio

  1. Actually (to the guy that said the five should be inclined)… brand uniformity is there all the way… since every number (except of course seven) is straight… no?

  2. I’m not keen on it as a logo (but then thinking about it, i’m not keen on the google logo, and we all know that has worked) but the whole package looks great, the way everything is kept clear and cinsistent and everything matches the logo says “great work” to me

  3. I like it, but I’m abit ‘so what’ about it.

    It has been so many times before, only with different colours and with a slightly different font.

    Designers can churn this sort of work out day after day.
    An opportunity missed I feel.

  4. The logo its self is generic and not very memorable. However all the branding together as a package becomes strong.

    It’s interesting to think about how a very mediocre logo can come to life when carried across additional materials.

    Maybe we should worry less about the individual logos being unique and more about a unique branding package?

  5. @Andres I was actually being tongue-in-cheek, but if you want to get technical it’s the only other number apart from seven spelled out in characters, so yes it should be inclined. But really, who cares?

  6. This is a vibrant and modern design style that seems to reflect the client well. The font usage is excellent, and the bold colour scheme fits in well with this. It’s clean, very easy to read and is easily adapted to a multitude of packaging and stationery ideas.

    I particularly like the brochure design, with the logo being cut off at a forty-five degree angle. The usage of black and white photos with the bold yellow colour scheme on top makes a good contract and focuses the user on the text rather than the images.

    You can learn a lot from these company profiles, being able to see their design styles and approaches to different projects. I would appreciate more of these in the future, thanks for another great article!

  7. Yellow/grey/white was a bit of a fad a few years ago, and looking at when the designs were produced it seems to make sense. I don’t dislike the overall branding, I think it’s visually effective. But I do get the feeling of over-thought/under-delivered with it all.

    Am I the only one seeing the actual figure “7” when the typed word “seven” is rotated diagonally and aligned top-right on the stationery and promo material?

    Maybe there’s more to the designs than meets the eye, let’s not jump to conclusions people.

  8. To those who are “so what?” about it, are we looking at the same thing? I am actually quite intrigued by the logo design and the overall branding. It’s the perfect *no flash* logo. It’s simple, direct, and the color choice really makes this pop. Guess what, I think I’d be interested if it was just black&white, too. Hats off to B&W Studio.

  9. I absolutely love this. This is exactly the sort of style I like and I think it will be disliked by very few. The yellow is bold and grabs attention and the type is clear and legible.

    A very strong brand image has been created here and hats off to the designers.

  10. I dig it. Even if you don’t like the design, it’s a strong ID.

    I wonder this had a purpose – when you “cut” seven off at the “n,” it nearly forms the word “sever.”

  11. I really like it. Yes, it might seem easy and generic, but it’s something I would definitely keep on my shelf for inspiration that simple always stands out. Besides, such simplicity gives room for special editions, like Google and their holiday logo changes – things like that.

  12. Quote Abbas: “Am I the only one seeing the actual figure “7″ when the typed word “seven” is rotated diagonally and aligned top-right on the stationery and promo material? ”

    I see it too.

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