Logo Design Love

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Your Logo is Not Hardcore

Your logo is not hardcore

In July last year Ean MacKaye began compiling logos with a pin-stroke X, or with two objects overlapping to form an X.

See them here: Your logo is not hardcore.

Reminded me of Dave Spengler’s Hipster Branding.

More similar logos (archives, 2008).

Logo Design Love: A Guide to Creating Iconic Brand Identities

13 appreciated comments

  1. This is an interesting thought because…

    It makes me think of local vs. global and the possibility for a new tendency towards regional or local. Yep, they’re so similar indeed. And one might think some designer took the easy train. But what if these are all meant to work for a small area, small town etc and they stand out where they are.

    Even more they are not the same, they just use similar logic. As others do with circles, triangles, squares and so on. Different logos on the same structure is something common, because there’s tons of ‘em. Can’t expect any different. They can’t all be as distinct as the swoosh. Not any more I think.

    But the most interesting thing that comes to my mind is if these are local businesses, and even if they’re not, such uniform design principle makes me think of heraldic emblems (these too are emblems rather than logos right?). They all had some shield with drawings on them, dividing the area as generations mixed with other houses.

    And last but not least. Logo design should not obey fashion. So very true but fashion is nothing but a particular habit adopted by the masses. As heraldics were (well masses using them were not as large). So technically there is nothing wrong with fashion, it’s the way a generation (at large) thinks, acts and so forth. In 100 years from now, the x won’t be fashionable any more, but they will describe the mentality from the beginning of the 21st century. So that simply links the business to its origins, or better said to it’s original concept and time.

    And I should end by saying we should stop being so eager for the sensational, the hardcore, the incredible. Maybe relax for a while and look at things closer, differentiate things for their particular features, rather than grouping them by style and throwing them all away. This should be said for more than just these logos. And I did not design any of these, nor did I ever use this style for an emblem.

    andrei

  2. Mitch

    Your Time is Not Well Spent

  3. Rich

    Thanks for the interesting read Andrei, I agree that not all the above logos are bad simply because they use this technique. To be honest I think it’s a great way of including the ‘tools of the trade’ so to speak, like the jolly roger or the soviet union.
    Equally I think this also shows how sometimes a logo is forced into a certain posture, either due to a demanding client or a trend-focused designer.

    If you have a unique style as a designer you should not be compromised by trends, for they are ever changing.

  4. Great post Andrei.

    A client recently asked us to do ‘something like I heart NY’ for a small town centre branding project. We had to explain that it infringed a copyright and that we didn’t think it was right anyway as it belonged to someone else. But it is widely copied which I think is wrong (as does NY as they are now going after people who violate their trademark).

    I like the logos above aesthetically, and of course many logos are unintentionally similar, there are so many people practicing design that I’d be very surprised if there wasn’t some overlap. But I’ve seen the above so often I can’t believe designers who create more of these types of identities don’t know what they are doing. They are all over pinterest and various Facebook pages. While they are all subtlety different, it’s still the same basic idea.

    But as Andrei says, it might be right for the job, especially if it is local. All design should be seen in context. But we should never intentionally infringe the visual equities of someones else’s identity.

  5. Interesting read. Thanks for sharing, shows a different perspective on things.

  6. Crystal

    Ehh, trendy or not, they look really nice and clean and modern. They’re not over-saturated in the market, and I think that appropriate use of icons could really support the company’s mission, industry or specialty.
    I say rock on.

  7. KevinN

    Uh… I just made one for jokes.

    I’m not laughing now.

  8. Andre Martinez

    I live in the Pacific Northwest and this HXC logo style is all over the place. I’ve even seen it being used in some of our top independent design agencies, *cough… “Parliament” – http://www.weareparliament.com/

    Most of these are very clean and well done by very talented designers but seriously, I’m getting tired of the same general concept.

    Let’s expand our creative bounds just a tad, yes?

  9. Sag

    This “X” style logo looks nice, clean, modern, neat.
    I personally think it’s a nice logo for an event, wedding, pop up store, crossover items, but not a long term business CI. As all trends die quick.
    It’s just like the drop shadow that used to be applied on EVERYTHING back in the day.

  10. Tensen

    I remember recently on one of the Graphic Design G+ communities someone asked “What do I google if I want to find those logos that are like an X with things in each section.”

    The first response was “Hipster Logo” to which the original asker said “I think I might need a bit more than that to find them.” Followed shortly by “Well I’ll be damned…”

  11. Nice point of view, Andrei.


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